The formation was linear. Forward they came, one by one. On and on, the partakers of this sacrament moved in unison. The little ones, arms crossed upon chest stood alongside adults to receive what was due them…a blessing. An honor to receive in any form and for now, until they understood more, the blessing would suffice.

“Take and eat, this is My body. Do this in memory of Me.” Matt. 26:26.

The table is set; grace is given as all are forgiven. Confession releases us to partake of His body and blood. After all, He gave it for all — once and for all — and all are welcome.

Trouble is, sometimes we justify rather than allow Him to do what He came for…to take away the burden, not add to it or to be a burden. In other words, we like to hang on to our sins rather than hand them over and let Him carry. To the world, releasing them can often be shameful, but He does not shame. He not only takes away, but carries all that is too heavy for us.

This world is not our home. Transition to the other side of the veil can be a stumbling block when we contrive our own strategies on how to get there. He has made a way; we need not make our own, nor can we.

Why do we stumble? Most often we, knowingly or unknowingly, want to be on the throne. We want to be in charge. We want to call the shots, so to speak. It comes natural to our old nature, but when we confess by admitting our short comings…sin dissipates as quickly as it enters once confessed.

Confession, what a gift it is to be aware of sin, to turn from and turn towards His forgiveness.

So now what? We confess. We partake. We humble ourselves to receive that which He has already given, His body broken for us.

What’s our part? Once we confess, we need merely receive the gift given.

When Communion Sunday rolls round, come to the table of grace which has been set. It’s an offering given for you — for once — for all — for you — for me.  

John 6:53 gives the reason for the gift which allows us to go, therefore, and live the Gospel. “I am telling you the truth: if you do not eat the flesh of the Son of Man and drink his blood you will not have life in you.”

Come as you are, just come. Amen.

Kathleen Kjolhaug lives on the family homestead outside of Clearbrook with her husband Pete. She enjoys writing about family life and brings humor into the sacred moments of everyday living.

Theology in the Trenches appears in several local newspapers throughout Minnesota. Kathleen can be reached by e-mail at wemenews@gvtel.com

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